College/University with Type 1 Diabetes
5/20/15
FacebookTwitterEmail

So you’re making the huge transition from high school to college — congratulations! College is awesome, but whether you’ve been recently diagnosed or have had diabetes for years, navigating college life with T1D will require extra precautions. As in grade school, your college is legally responsible for accommodating your T1D needs, but it’s your responsibility to make your T1D known and to request the assistance you deserve.

Contact your school’s Office of Disability Services

As a student with T1D, you have a right to accommodations. As soon as you make your decision, contact your college’s Office of Disability Services to see what services they offer. Many colleges require that you provide a letter from your doctor that includes your T1D diagnosis and a request for specific accommodations.

Examples of special accommodations include:

  • On campus housing and in-room accommodations, like refrigerators for insulin and snacks
  • Campus meal plan, including nutritional information and access to dorms with cafeterias or accessibility to those near by
  • Early class registration to ensure optimal schedule
  • Notification to teaching staff of your T1D status
  • Breaks during class and exams for self-care
  • Ability to reschedule exams in cases of hypo/hyperglycemia
  • Changes to classroom attendance policies to accommodate the potential for sudden hypo/hyperglycemia or diabetes-related illnesses

Find more information on your rights as a college student with T1D HERE.

Your Medical Care Checklist

  1. FERPA (The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act) gives parents certain rights with respect to their children’s education and medical records. These rights transfer to the student when he or she reaches the age of 18. If you want your parents to assist in any way with your medical care while you are at college, be sure to authorize access during the enrollment process.
  2. Check in with your campus Student Health Services to see what health care options are available. Arrange to have your most recent T1D information from your endocrinologist on file.
  3. Download this form from the College Diabetes Network for Important Diabetes Contact Information
  4. Contact an endocrinologist/diabetes team in your new location, if necessary.
  5. Find a local pharmacy and/or arrange for mail-order prescription refills.
  6. Be SURE to wear medical alert ID.
  7. Download RapidSOS for FREE for a year HERE. (Learn more about RapidSOS.)
  8. Set up your room with plenty of low supplies, emergency sugar next to your bed and a headlamp or flashlight for nighttime BG testing.
  9. If you plan to drink alcohol, familiarize yourself with the Diabetes Drinking Chart.

Talk to your roommate/Resident Hall Advisor (RA)

Both your roommate and RA will need to know about your T1D. You can email your roommate this guide: Talking to Your Roommate about Type 1 Diabetes.

Essentials


Teaching Type 1 to others


Daily Life


Stories


Stories for parents


This is part of our School Resources series. Click here for other grade levels, stories, downloadables and content.