Back to Shots

There are a number of reasons why switching from your insulin pump back to shots (MDI), using insulin pens or syringes, is sometimes necessary.

The BFF Guide to Type 1 Diabetes

I can do anything other kids can do. I just have to check my blood and bolus (take insulin) if I’m eating. I can ride my bike, play baseball, run, and do all those types of fun activities. Just please be patient with me if I need to take a break and check my blood sugar or have a snack.

Count Carbs Like a Pro — A Parent’s Guide

Counting carbohydrates accurately is both a science and an art. One that takes time, practice and a lot of hard work. When parents master carb counting early on, it becomes second nature to the entire family and can lead to better blood sugars for your child with diabetes.

Insulin Pump Rundown

Choosing an insulin pump doesn’t have to be an overwhelming process. Should you go with a more traditional pump where you can monitor your insulin levels directly? Are you looking for a model that works with a BGM monitor and allows you to administer insulin via a remote?

Ketones — The 6 Must-Knows

Editor's Note: Kyla Schmieg (BSN, RN) is a practicing pediatric endocrinology nurse in Cincinnati, OH, USA, and Type 1 Diabetic, working on the same unit she was diagnosed at 26 years ago. 1 - What are ketones? Ketones are chemicals that build up when your body starts to burn fat for energy. The most common cause of ketones in diabetics is insulin deficiency. Without enough insulin, glucose builds up in the blood stream and can’t enter cells. The cells then burn fat instead of glucose. This results in ketones forming in the blood and eventually spilling into urine. 2 - Why ketones can be bad? Having ketones can be bad because they can indicate that your body needs more insulin. Ketone build up can also lead to Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA). Signs of DKA include moderate or large ketones, nausea,vomiting, abdominal pain, fruity or acetone (think nail polish remover) breath, rapid breathing, flushed skin, and lack of energy. 3 - When should you check for ketones? Ketones should be checked anytime your blood sugar is above 240 or any time you are sick. This includes any minor illness such as a cold. 4 - Can you get ketones with a high blood sugar? Ketones typically accompany high blood sugar. Ketones indicate your body needs more insulin. Most often if your body needs more insulin, it means your probably have a high blood sugar. Also, when an illness is present, your body releases hormones in response to the stress. These hormones lead to elevated blood glucose. That is why it’s recommended to test ketone levels during illness. 5 - Can you get ketones with a normal or low blood sugar? Ketones can also be present when your blood sugar is normal or low. These are sometimes referred to as "starvation ketones" or "nutritional ketones." During an illness or extreme diet change, if you have a significant decrease in carb intake, this can lead to the body using fat for energy because there are not enough carbs present to burn. Your blood sugar could remain normal or even be low in this case but your body could still be producing ketones. 6 - What should you do if you have ketones? It is recommended that you drink 8 ounces of water or carb/caffeine free beverage every 30-60 minutes to help flush out the ketones. Again, ketones are a sign that your body needs more insulin. Some people might already have an insulin dosing plan in place related to ketones. It’s typically a percentage of your daily lantus dose or percentage of your total daily basal volume (for pump users) based on whether ketones are small, moderate or large. It is always best to call your endocrinologist to verify what they recommend when ketones are present.

Hypoglycemia and How to Treat It

It's important to know that treatment of hypoglycemia depends on the severity of hypoglycemic episode, and whether or not patient is conscious. Also, remember that recurrence of hypoglycemia is common.

Fasting with Type 1 Diabetes

In the Type 1 community, food and eating habits are not only a common subject of conversation, but a necessary component of management. A common dietary practice that is important to acknowledge in this space is Fasting.

The Co-Worker’s Guide to Type 1 Diabetes

Perhaps you will work with someone who has Type 1 diabetes, or you are simply interested in learning more. Consider this guide to help you learn the ins and outs of Type 1 diabetes in the work force.

Halloween — T1D Tips for a Not-So-Scary Holiday

Witches and goblins and ghouls — oh, my! Snickers and Skittles and Twix — oh, no! Are you dreading Halloween and the influx of sugar-packed treats that are circulating the neighborhood? Don’t worry! Beyond Type 1 has come up with these T1D Halloween tips that will put you at ease and keep your pumpkin(s) grinning.

Anxiety + Diabetes

When this distress gets too high, or is disproportionate to the situation provoking it, the person tends to suffer from anxiety instead of benefitting from it. You don’t have to dig deep to find a reason for increased levels of anxiety in those living with Type 1 diabetes.

A Coach’s Guide to Type 1 Diabetes

As a coach, you want to push each member of your team. Don’t see Type 1 as a roadblock; see Type 1 as a challenge that your athlete takes on everyday. Here is what you should know about Type 1 diabetes an how it affects your athlete.

Insulin Delivery

For people with Type 1 diabetes and in some cases those with Type 2 diabetes, insulin must be injected and infused into the layers of fat under the skin. There are quite a few different ways to deliver insulin, each with pros and cons, and it is up to the person with Type 1 and his or her doctor to decide what will work best.

Hormones and their Affect on Type 1 Diabetes Management

For people with Type 1 diabetes, there are certain stages in life that can seem a bit more like a rollercoaster than others. In most cases, these ups and downs can be attributed to a shift in hormones. Major hormonal changes can be due to many things, such as puberty, menopause, menstrual cycle, stress and illness, to name a few.

Insulin Allergies + Type 1

Imagine having Type 1 diabetes. Now imagine being allergic to the very thing that keeps you alive. Allergic reactions to insulin are rare, but they do exist.